A review of the volcanic history and stratigraphy of northeastern New Mexico, the Ocate and Raton-Clayton volcanic fields
Edward M. Calvin

Abstract:

Volcanic rocks of northeastern New Mexico lie on the eastern flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and can be divided into two major fields, the Ocate and the Raton-Clayton volcanic fields. These two fields are Miocene-Pleistocene in age and constitute the northeastern extension of the Jemez lineament. The Ocate lavas erupted in a series of five pluses over a 7 m.y. period and, based on geochemical and petrographic criteria, are delineated into five rock types: alkali olivine-basalt (AOB), transitional olivine-basalt (TOB), xenocrystic basaltic andesite (XBA), olivine andesite (OA) and dacite (Nielsen and Dungan, 1985). According to Stormer (1972b), the Raton-Clayton volcanic field can also be divided into five rock types: (1) Raton-Clayton alkali olivine basalts, (2) Red Mountain dacites and andesites, (3) Sierra Grande pyroxene andesite, (4) a feldspathoidal group and (5) the Capulin-type basaltic lavas.


Citation:

  1. Calvin, Edward M., 1987, A review of the volcanic history and stratigraphy of northeastern New Mexico, the Ocate and Raton-Clayton volcanic fields, in: Northeastern New Mexico, Lucas, S. G.; Hunt, A. P., New Mexico Geological Society, Guidebook, 38th Field Conference, pp. 83-85.

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